Contact us

Louisiana
Center for the Book

Celebrating Readers, Writers and Their Books

If you are looking for Information on author submission criteria, follow this link or email the Louisiana Book Festival Office with questions concerning author submissions.

SEND US EMAIL
TEL: (225) 219 - 9503 Louisiana Center for the Book
701 N. Fourth St.
Baton Rouge, LA 70802
www.LouisianaBookFestival.org

Contact us

Louisiana
Center for the Book

Celebrating Readers, Writers and Their Books

If you are looking for Information on author submission criteria, follow this link or email the Louisiana Book Festival Office with questions concerning author submissions.

SEND US EMAIL
(225) 219 - 9503
Louisiana Center for the Book
701 N. Fourth St.
Baton Rouge, LA 70802

Authors

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Al Godoy
Al  Godoy picture

Al Godoy is a Senior Producer at Louisiana Public Broadcasting. He was co-producer and co-director for the six-part documentary series Louisiana: A History. He wrote the script for Frame after Frame, a half-hour documentary that aired nationally on PBS. The program was honored with a National Education Association award, a CINE Golden Eagle, Best-of-Show at the New Orleans Film and Video Festival, and numerous other awards. Recent projects include producing the Louisiana Legends series of interviews with prominent Louisiana personalities.

Screening: Louisiana: 200 Years of Statehood

On April 30, 1812, Louisiana became the 18th state in the Union. In conjunction with the statewide celebration of the 200th anniversary of Louisiana’s statehood, Louisiana Public Broadcasting worked with the Louisiana State Bicentennial Commission to produce a new one-hour documentary which looks back at the first 200 years of the state’s history.

Narrated by Grammy and Emmy-winner and New Orleans-native Harry Connick, the one-hour documentary focuses on the most significant events in the state’s first two centuries.

From the moment Louisiana became the 18th state on April 30, 2012, the Bayou State has always done things its own way. In fact, the United States wasn’t quite sure what to make of its newest state and Louisiana didn’t quite fit in with the other 17 states for a number of years. The tension lessened after an outmanned, ragtag group of U.S. soldiers, Louisiana and Tennessee volunteers and pirates defeated the British at the Battle of New Orleans on January 8, 1815.

In the past 200 years, Louisiana has survived massive floods, devastating hurricanes and the Civil War. Combining the contributions for seven different nationalities, it developed its own unique cuisine. From the streets and barrooms of New Orleans came Jazz. . Along the way it has more than its share of charismatic and sometimes controversial political figures like former Governors Huey and Earl Long and Edwin Edwards. With the recent elections of Kathleen Blanco, the first woman governor in the state’s history, and Bobby Jindal, the nation’s first Indian American governor, the state has entered a new era of politics.

 

2:45 PM – 4 PM

Capitol Park Welcome Center, Screening Room

Screening

Louisiana: 200 Years of Statehood